Matt Brown convicted for DUI

Matt Brown, star of “Alaskan Bush People,” a Discovery reality series of the Brown family, was recently revealed to have been arrested for DUI in 2013. At 4:45AM on August 30th 2013, after witnesses claimed that he hit a parked motorcycle with a Volvo at a Walmart parking lot in Alaska, Matt was pulled over by the police.

 

 

 

 Matt Brown, star of “Alaskan Bush People,” a Discovery reality series of the Brown family, was recently revealed to have been arrested for DUI in 2013. At 4:45AM on August 30th 2013, after witnesses claimed that he hit a parked motorcycle with a Volvo at a Walmart parking lot in Alaska, Matt was pulled over by the police.

The police report described Matt to be “nervous and jumpy” and that he smelled like a homeless person.” Matt denied his involvement in the crash, drinking or doing drugs. When asked about his weird behaviour, Matt replied that he had Attention Deficit Disorder.

Matt, 33, admitted he didn’t own the car, claiming it belonged to a girl he had just met at a nearby bar for sex. He insisted that the car was borrowed with permission to buy chips at Walmart. He did not know the girl’s name, location and contact information.

Later, he admitted that he drank 2 or 3 vodka shots, however continued to deny hitting the motorcycle. Matt failed the standardized field sobriety test, he horizontal gaze nystagmus test, the walk and turn test and the one leg stand test and brought to the police department headquarters for processing. He had a .150 blood alcohol level on a Breathalyzer test, a high level in which drinkers can blackout and vomit. According to the police, Matt “attempted to throw up in a waste basket” during the breathalyzer test. He was charged with DUI and sentenced to three days in jail and 18 months of probation in February 2014.

A record of criminal conviction can make entry to Canada a challenge. A DUI is one of the most common barriers for travelling looking to cross the Canadian border. “Driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol and possession of or trafficking in drugs or controlled substances.” may render an applicant or visitor “criminally inadmissible” under Canada’s Immigration and refugee Protection Act.

However, it is possible to overcome criminal inadmissibility through rehabilitation, or through a temporary resident permit if you are ineligible for a rehabilitation. By going through rehabilitation, your record is wiped clean for the purpose of Canadian immigration. You are eligible to apply for rehabilitation if you have been convicted outside of Canada and five years have passed since the sentence was completed (including the payment of fines). 

If more than 10 years have passed since the date a sentence was completed, you may be deemed rehabilitated for one indictable offence if the crime is punishable by a maximum prison term of less than 10 years in Canada, or if you have summary convictions. A serious criminality can never be deemed rehabilitated, therefore, must always go through a rehabilitation. For more information, refer to deemed rehabilitation.

A temporary resident permit may be an option for you if you have a valid reason to come to Canada, however, are ineligible for rehabilitation. However, it requires specific circumstances to travel to Canada that is justified and you do not pose a risk due to your past criminal record. Generally, leisure activities will not be granted a temporary resident permit.

It is also possible to become admissible to Canada through a pardon or record suspension. In the U.S., many states may allow those charged with DUI a conditional discharge, which leaves no conviction on their criminal record after successful completion of probation. For specific information on whether your state offers conditional discharge programs, visit state conditional discharge programs. For more information on State-Specific procedures, visit state clearance policies.

FWCanada is a Canadian Immigration Law Firm which provides expertise in immigration services such as Temporary Resident Permits, Criminal Rehabilitation, Study Permits and Work Permits. Marisa Feil and her team ensure that each case is closely evaluated to determine the most relevant program. For more information, contact FWCanada at 1-855-316-3555.

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